Is It Safe To Gnaw Through The Straps Now? (ericcoleman) wrote,
Is It Safe To Gnaw Through The Straps Now?
ericcoleman

So, done ...

I've updated my bio (which I need to do on the website as well). I put a new photo on it (the one I was using was from the back cover of Fear And Self Loathing) and updated some info and made it a little more sarcastic (hey, I gotta be true to myself. Here it is ... opinions are always welcome ...

I also found the stuff that I send out as a press kit, man I need some new press, this stuff is all 2 years old.



Eric Coleman - The Real Story

From his hapless manhandling of a drum set in the mid 70’s to nasally punk singer in the late 70’s to hopelessly trendy synth-pop maven in the 80’s to a mostly failed attempt to ignore the entire 1990’s, Eric has had the sort of career that would make most musicians hopelessly incontinent.

White Lunch
Most people who were in the band say that White Lunch was the first punk band in Iowa. There are people in other bands (and at least one member of White Lunch) who dispute this. Eric was the drummer ... till they actually had to play somewhere. Then they fired him and got someone who could do silly things like pay attention and keep time. He went on to drum for several other bands, all of whom pay him money (in one case as much as 2 dollars) not to mention their names.

Jim?
Here is where Eric begins his long career as a singer, although this could certainly be disputed by anyone who heard Eric “sing” at this point in his life. While there are several people who say that Jim? was one of the best bands they ever saw. None of them say that Jim? was the best band that they ever heard. Eric wrote all the songs (for the first time in his “career”) on a bass that looked like a Gibson SG and that sounded like a transistor radio set to stun. Jim? were known for annoying all the punks, who thought they were posers (they were) and entertaining all the non-punks who thought they were hysterical (the jury is still out on this). The fact that he and guitar player Mike Kuhl were both part-time standup comics certainly didn’t help matters.

Soldiers In A Field
In the early 80’s Eric buys a cheap synthesizer (at least he claims it was a synthesizer) and starts to make ambient music. He plays at a yearly Lincoln NE punk festival where his quiet, still music creates a sensation. Either that or it was people having fun outside. In a day full of thrash bands he clears the room. One good thing comes out of it. He meets fellow synth freak Mike Sangster and Soldiers In A Field is formed. Generally the band was an outlet for Eric’s lyrics and Mike’s music although even that was a very malleable concept since Mike wrote some of the lyrics and Eric wrote some of the music. They played a couple dozen shows, recorded two songs for a single that was never released, brought in 3rd member Alex Abajian to fill out the sound, and finally split after Mike wanted to do something with different textures. Music by the band can at last be heard at www.audiostreet.net/soldiersinafield.

The Lost Years
Like so many guys before him who couldn’t bring himself to meet women in a conventional way, Eric broke down and bought an electric guitar with hopes that it would help. However he waited about a decade after most folks his age had already started to play. A friend had shown him a couple of chords (E & A for those of you who feel the need to know, it’s also significant that these chords are the same shape) and he wrote a bunch of songs around those chords (and that shape, sometimes placed in odd places on the neck). He spent most of the late 80’s developing a reverby, echoey style that was already years out of date. The turning point came when, with some tax money sometime in the late 80’s (Eric’s grip on time has not improved since his drummer days), he bought a cheap Fender acoustic guitar and his life was changed forever. He spent the 90’s ripping off various of his favorite guitar players (his Townsend phase was especially silly as was his acoustic thrash phase) till he finally put it all together into his own distinct style.

Solo And Beyond
Eric writes from two distinctly different points of view. He is either putting to tape “hopelessly sad songs filled with bitterness and middle aged angst” or he is “making cruel fun of people who, frankly, make a lot more money than I do”. At least that is his glib take on it. In reality Eric is writing either character studies of nervous, lonely and frustrated folks that are very much like people you know (and who frequently are people he knows, expect lawsuits if he ever gets famous), or he is writing oddball social satire with a vicious sense of humor. His live set is punctuated with stories about the songs and the people in them as well as abuse for anyone foolish enough to ask Eric to play a cover song (he does know a few and will give you a free CD if you know who did them originally, he loves it when people get his references). His song Bang My Bald Spot was played on the Dr Demento Show a couple of times. He has songs featured on Highway 61 Folks Festival - 4th Annual Songwriters Collection, and Laughter Is A Powerful Weapon Vol 2, where he is in the company of folks like Weird Al Yankovic and Barnes And Barnes. This year Eric is looking to do shows at folk venues and coffee houses in the Midwest to support his most recent CD Some See The Glass Half Empty and premiering songs from his upcoming release, I Had To Suffer For My Art, Now It's Your Turn as well as spending a lot of time writing about himself in the third person.
Tags: bio
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments